Lipipor™ NEO Filters for Neonatal Parenteral Nutrition (EU) product photo Primary L

Lipipor™ NEO Filters for Neonatal Parenteral Nutrition (EU)

The Pall Lipipor NEO filter has a 1.2 μm polyethersulfone membrane for use in paediatric and neonatal care for infusions of nutrient lipid emulsions. It offers patient protection against:
  • Air: preventing air embolism 
  • Particles: protecting the circulatory system against the undesirable effects of infusing particulate contamination, including flocculates and precipitates. Protecting the vein during peripheral infusion
  • Enlarged lipid droplets: Significantly reducing the number of droplets (<5 μm) in emulsions
  • Microbes: reducing the risk of infection due to inadvertantly contaminated infusates, particularly with fungi of clinical importance

Inadvertent Contamination of Parenteral Nutrition Preparations Can Have Serious Consequences

  • Air can become entrained in infusions due to degassing, disconnection or run-dry. It may not be visible in lipid-containing preparations. It can be particularly problematic on central venous line infusions, leading to air embolism 1.
  • Particulate contamination arises from infusion systems, components, manipulations 2and as precipitates due to interactions between nutrient components 3. Particles are deposited in the microvasculature of the lungs and other organs and may have serious clinical consequences 4. Gross precipitation in admixtures has proved fatal and may not be visible when lipid is present 3.
  • Enlarged lipid droplets arise in admixtures due to instability. It has been suggested that the proportion of lipid present as droplets >5 μm should be minimized, since large numbers may lodge in the lung microvasculature and produce an embolic syndrome 5.
  • Microbial contamination can arise in infusion systems inadvertently due to manipulations. Parenteral nutrition is an acknowledged risk for fungaemia, with Candida species being the most common organisms involved 6. Malassezia furfur is also emerging as an increasingly important pathogen in neonates 7. These fungi are able to survive and grow in lipid-containing preparations 7,8.

References

  1. Coppa. GF et al JPEN 1980;5:166-8.
  2. Foroni LA. et al J Parent Sci Technol 1993;47:311-4
  3. US FDA Safety Alert. Am J Hosp Pharm 1994;51:1427-8.
  4. Walpot H et al. Anaesthetist 1989;38:544-8.
  5. Driscoll DF et al. JPEN 1996;20:296-301
  6. Vazquez J et al. J Infect Dis 1993;168:195-201.
  7. Robinson R and Ball P. NZ Hosp Pharm Assoc. Oct 1996
  8. Scheckelhoff DJ et al. Am J Hosp Pharm 1986;43:73-7


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Description
The Pall Lipipor NEO filter has a 1.2 μm polyethersulfone membrane for use in paediatric and neonatal care for infusions of nutrient lipid emulsions. It offers patient protection against:
  • Air: preventing air embolism 
  • Particles: protecting the circulatory system against the undesirable effects of infusing particulate contamination, including flocculates and precipitates. Protecting the vein during peripheral infusion
  • Enlarged lipid droplets: Significantly reducing the number of droplets (<5 μm) in emulsions
  • Microbes: reducing the risk of infection due to inadvertantly contaminated infusates, particularly with fungi of clinical importance

Inadvertent Contamination of Parenteral Nutrition Preparations Can Have Serious Consequences

  • Air can become entrained in infusions due to degassing, disconnection or run-dry. It may not be visible in lipid-containing preparations. It can be particularly problematic on central venous line infusions, leading to air embolism 1.
  • Particulate contamination arises from infusion systems, components, manipulations 2and as precipitates due to interactions between nutrient components 3. Particles are deposited in the microvasculature of the lungs and other organs and may have serious clinical consequences 4. Gross precipitation in admixtures has proved fatal and may not be visible when lipid is present 3.
  • Enlarged lipid droplets arise in admixtures due to instability. It has been suggested that the proportion of lipid present as droplets >5 μm should be minimized, since large numbers may lodge in the lung microvasculature and produce an embolic syndrome 5.
  • Microbial contamination can arise in infusion systems inadvertently due to manipulations. Parenteral nutrition is an acknowledged risk for fungaemia, with Candida species being the most common organisms involved 6. Malassezia furfur is also emerging as an increasingly important pathogen in neonates 7. These fungi are able to survive and grow in lipid-containing preparations 7,8.

References

  1. Coppa. GF et al JPEN 1980;5:166-8.
  2. Foroni LA. et al J Parent Sci Technol 1993;47:311-4
  3. US FDA Safety Alert. Am J Hosp Pharm 1994;51:1427-8.
  4. Walpot H et al. Anaesthetist 1989;38:544-8.
  5. Driscoll DF et al. JPEN 1996;20:296-301
  6. Vazquez J et al. J Infect Dis 1993;168:195-201.
  7. Robinson R and Ball P. NZ Hosp Pharm Assoc. Oct 1996
  8. Scheckelhoff DJ et al. Am J Hosp Pharm 1986;43:73-7
Specifications

Technical Specifications

 
 Filter Media 1.2 μm Polyethersulfone membrane
 Tubing Extension Non-phthalate microbore
 Hold up Volume
(filter housing + extension tubing)
0.5 mL
 Maximum Recommended Flow Rate 10 mL/hour
 Maximum Working Pressure 30 psi
 Connectors  ISO male luer lock outlet & ISO female luer lock inlet
 Usage  Single patient use
 24 hours usage
 
Type
In-line Filters
Use
Filtration
Ordering Information
 
Description Reorder Number Packaging
 Pall Lipipor NEO Filter for Parenteral Nutrition  NLF1E  40 units per case
 
Application
Hospital Infusion, Hospital Infusion, Hospital Infusion